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Custom Table Types

If you want to be able to use a table as a global, input, output, or local variable you need to create a variable type. Variable types are custom tables that are similar to an Excel spreadsheet. You define the columns you want the table to have and then you can add/remove/update rows.


Creating a Table Type

Variable types are managed under the Variable Types tab of the Variables section. If you have any existing custom table types, they’ll be listed there. To create a new one, click the New Variable Type button.

When creating a custom table, you’ll need to provide a display name and then define your columns. Each column has various attributes:

  • Required - Whether or not the field is required
  • Field Name - The name of the field when used as a variable
  • Field Title - A human-readable field name
  • Field Type - The data type of the field
  • Max Length - The maximum length for values in this field (for strings)
  • Minimum - The minimum value (for numeric data types)
  • Maximum - The maximum value (for numeric data types)

Here’s an example of a table called My Endpoint Table meant to contain a list of endpoints and whether or not they’re active:

The columns in this table include:

  • ip_address - The endpoints IP address as a string no longer than 15 characters
  • hostname - The endpoint’s hostname as a string
  • is_active - Whether or not the endpoint is active as a boolean (true/false)

Creating a Global Variable

Using a custom table type is more or less the same as any other variable type. You select your custom type as the Data Type and then provide a display name. However, when using a table type as a global variable, you have to provide at least one row to create the variable.

Here’s what it looks like creating a global variable using a custom table type with one row in it:


Creating a Workflow Variable

Using a custom table type within a workflow is the same as any other variable type. You select your custom type as the Data Type and then provide a display name and scope. You can add default rows if you want, but it’s not required.

Here’s what it looks like creating a local variable within a workflow using a custom table type with no rows in it:


Usage

Custom table types behave the same as any other table when used within a workflow. For more information about using tables, check out the Tables section.

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